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Department of Art

Upcoming - Bachelor of Arts (BFA) Exhibitions

December 10-14, 2018

Bachelor of Fine Arts Senior Exhibition 2

Kansas State University Department of Art will present the final BFA Thesis Exhibitions of the fall semester featuring Melissa Donlon, Tyler Jones, Anna Rose Rassette, Logan Robertson, Anthony Stepp, and Stephen Taylor. The artists will showcase an exhibition of their undergraduate artwork from December 10 through 14, 2018 in the Mark A. Chapman Gallery, first floor of Willard Hall. Gallery hours are 10 am – 5 pm, Monday through Friday. Please feel free to attend the reception with the artists on Friday evening, December 14, from 5:30 to 7:30 pm in the gallery.

Admission is free and open to the public.

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Painter, Melissa Donlon, of Lafayette, Georgia, explores the relationship between humor and memory in her large-scale paintings. She creates realistic scenes that reference her experiences living in rural America. The raw canvas and exposed underdrawing nod to her process of making while simultaneously placing her figures into a partially realized environment that mimics the mind's process of recollection.

Tyler Jones, from Wichita, Kansas, utilizes his familiarity with multiple media to create interactive interface installation art. His work generally underscores topics of social structure and personal identity through symbolism. "I found a niche environment where I could meld my creativity with technology in ways that previously seemed inaccessible due to steep learning curves." His hope is that he can eventually use his technical skills to garner understanding and capability to individuals who feel a similar inaccessibility to new media.

Ceramicist Anna Rassette from Leawood, Kansas, sculpts life-size figures from clay and creates environments constructed with vibrant mixed media materials. Through her expressive mark-making and the positions, the figures are placed in, they are transported into a space of unguarded human transparency and impermanence. "Impacted by my own tendency to self-shame I express the distorted view of oneself and the disregard for the true self that is waiting to be grown and voiced." Disregard of the true self is expressed through bodily formations and energetic colors displayed through her installations.

Logan Robertson, a Metalsmith from Shawnee, Kansas, makes amorphous, organic jewelry. Each piece starts with wax that is molded into blobs, bulges, bubbles, dents, holes, and hands. These wax forms are then cast in metal, sanded, finished, and painted. "The result is a family of strange objects that vary from familiar to alien, playful to eccentric to downright creepy," she says. Her main series titled "Little Curios" explores the juxtaposition of form, color, and content. It seeks to challenge the conventional perception of jewelry and how it is worn, superseding the traditional polished aesthetic in favor of forms that are more curious.

Anthony Stepp, a printmaker from Manhattan, Kansas, works in screenprint and etching to work through the dichotomy of his views of art. He uses illustrative screenprints that could be from a storyboard juxtaposed against expressive abstract etchings. These two different styles of work are presented as one, "sometimes playing together nicely, sometimes fighting for control, mimicking my experience with art," to give an image of this personal dichotomy.

Painter, Stephen Taylor from Kansas City, Kansas creates art reminiscent of comic books and the Pop Art. He is in his final semester at Kansas State University and will be completing his BFA in studio art with a concentration in painting. His work combines clean lines and complementing colors that bring you into the painting. Stephen says that his work "rewards a prolonged viewing" and that attention to detail is key. His art themes center around friendship and multiculturalism while exploring classic comic book troupes and graphical styles.

The Mark A. Chapman Gallery on the first floor of Willard Hall, across from the art office, opened in 2005. Cheryl Mellenthin and Mark Chapman funded a complete renovation of the former Willard Hall Gallery, increasing the exhibition space to over 1,400 square feet along with 400 square feet dedicated to exhibition preparation and kitchen facilities. The Department of Art hosts BFA and MFA student exhibitions in the gallery as part of graduation requirements each semester. The technology friendly gallery serves not only exhibition purposes, but also provides a location for an active Visiting Artist lecture program.

December 3-7, 2018

Bachelor of Fine Arts Senior Exhibition 1

Kansas State University Department of Art will present the first of two BFA Thesis Exhibitions of the fall semester featuring Sarah Beatty, Nicholas Burrowes, Braden Byers, Anton Deblauwe, Kenny Nam Dinh, and Kenneth Wilson Jr. The artists will showcase an exhibition of their undergraduate artwork from December 3 through 7, 2018 in the Mark A. Chapman Gallery, first floor of Willard Hall. Gallery hours are 10 am – 5 pm, Monday through Friday. Please feel free to attend the reception with the artists on Friday evening, December 7, from 5:30 to 7:30 pm in the gallery.

Admission is free and open to the public.

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Sarah Beatty, of Manhattan, Kansas, makes multi-plate prints based on her experience with mental illness. The etchings include journal entries and experiences of how anxiety and depression have impacted her life with the hope that it may be able to help someone else. "These prints represent things that many people go through but may not acknowledge or realize; it is important that they are talked about." These prints use text and color help to add a sense of what it means to deal with daily life while also dealing with a mental illness.

Nicholas Burrowes, a photographer from Middlesboro, KY, creates images of the male nude in an attempt to take a closer look at the individual. Nicholas strives to show a more intimate look into the individuals he depicts by photographing them in a personal space and setting, usually inside of their homes. He says "We work hard to project an image of ourselves to others even if we are not fully aware of it. I'm more interested in finding what is beneath that surface level." His photographic work attempts to display the "true self" and vulnerability of the individual.

Braden Byers, a photographer from Wichita, Kansas, creates photographs using double exposed 35mm film. His technique aims to create a feeling of accidental intensity while portraying the human figure in both a vulnerable and isolated state. He is influenced strongly by photographers of the 1930s and early era film photography, bridging the gap between the roots of photography and modern day processes. His prints aim to question how we feel at our most vulnerable states as well as how we feel when we are isolated.

Anton Deblauwe, of Overland Park, Kansas, makes textural rings and sculptures using molds made from the textures on found objects. The textures come from a mix of both natural and man-made objects. "The textures remind me of my childhood, collecting rocks or small objects and keeping them in my pockets to play with." Casting the work in bronze and silver brings out the details of the textures and elevates them to a new level.

Kenny Nam Dinh is a digital experimental artist from Dodge City, Kansas, whose main focus is making use of telecommunications of the internet for interaction. He is inspired by the technology and the people all over the world, leading to an experimentation of worldly delay internet interaction. He says, "No one can experience the exact same moment with someone on the other side of the world." In Kenny's experimentation of network art, the goal for the people is to think of the delay in time caused by technology and distance.

Kenneth Wilson Jr., a DX Media artist from Kansas City, Missouri, makes interactive art through digital animation and coding software like the Unity game engine. With inspiration from game art and technology, Kenneth has always had an interest in solving and exploring issues related to the relationship between the real world and technology. The project being featured in the exhibition is focused on the secrets of society and the lengths that people will follow to find out those secrets. Kenneth's art not only show the world in a lens that not many think about, but his art allows the audience to experience that lens through interactivity.

The Mark A. Chapman Gallery on the first floor of Willard Hall, across from the art office, opened in 2005. Cheryl Mellenthin and Mark Chapman funded a complete renovation of the former Willard Hall Gallery, increasing the exhibition space to over 1,400 square feet along with 400 square feet dedicated to exhibition preparation and kitchen facilities. The Department of Art hosts BFA and MFA student exhibitions in the gallery as part of graduation requirements each semester. The technology friendly gallery serves not only exhibition purposes, but also provides a location for an active Visiting Artist lecture program.

 

Archived Bachelor of Arts (BFA) Exhibitions: